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General information  

  • Date of birth : 15/11/1951

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  • D'Angelo Beverly

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Beverly D'Angelo (1951)

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  Summary  

Beverly Heather D'Angelo is an American actress and singer.

  Biography  

 early life
D'Angelo was born in Columbus, Ohio, the daughter of Priscilla (née Smith), a violinist, and Gene D'Angelo, a bass player and television station manager. She is of part Italian ancestry. Her maternal grandfather, Howard Dwight Smith, was the architect who designed Ohio Stadium, also known as "the Horseshoe" at Ohio State University. She has three brothers, Jeff, Tim and Tony. She attended Upper Arlington High School.

 career
D'Angelo began work in the theatre, appearing on Broadway in 1976 in Rockabye Hamlet a musical based on Shakespeare's Hamlet. Although the production was a failure, running less than a month, D'Angelo's performance as Ophelia attracted positive attention.

D'Angelo made her debut in the first three episodes of the TV mini-series Captains and the Kings in 1976. After gaining a minor role in Annie Hall in 1977, D'Angelo appeared in a string of hit movies in the late 1970s, including Every Which Way But Loose, Hair, and Coal Miner's Daughter, the latter earning her a Golden Globe nomination for Best Supporting Actress and a Country Music Association award for Album of the Year. Her biggest break came in 1983, starring with Chevy Chase in National Lampoon's Vacation in the role of Ellen Griswold. She reprised this role in three Vacation sequels and a short film from 1985 through 2010. D'Angelo received an Emmy nomination for her performance in the 1984 TV movie version of A Streetcar Named Desire. In 1992, she had a guest appearance in the third season of The Simpsons as Lurleen Lumpkin, a beautiful Southern country singer and waitress, in "Colonel Homer", and sixteen years later in 2008, she appeared in the nineteenth season—as the same character—in the episode "Papa Don't Leech".

She has a recurring role on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as defense attorney Rebecca Balthus. In 2006, she starred in the independent cult hit Gamers: The Movie. She can be seen on the hit HBO series Entourage, playing the role of agent Barbara "Babs" Miller.

In 2008, D'Angelo had a role in the film Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay as Sally. She played the housemother in the film The House Bunny, and also appeared in the Tony Kaye film Black Water Transit, and in David O. Russell's Nailed as Jessica Biel's mother.

 personal life
In 1981, D'Angelo married Italian aristocrat Don Lorenzo Salviati, the only son and heir of Don Forese Salviati, 5th Duke Salviati, Marchese di Montieri and Boccheggiano, Nobile Romano Coscritto, and his wife, the former Maria Grazia Gawronska. They separated in 1983 and divorced in 1995.

From 1985 until 1991, D'Angelo lived with Irish director Neil Jordan. During this time, she had a small role in his 1988 comedy High Spirits, as well as the operatic film Aria in which she played Gilda in the Rigoletto scene . Later, she began a relationship with Anton Furst, an Academy award-winning production designer, who committed suicide in 1991.

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Whole or part of the information contained in this card come from the Wikipedia article "Beverly D'Angelo", licensed under CC-BY-SA full list of contributors here.